Short walk #13

 

Psst! Follow me. On a short walk down a dark street.

Another week, another round of links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Each morning, Ray Dempsey parked his considerable rump on a stool behind his talking cash register and spent the entire day monitoring his tiny domain with his four working senses. From “The Movie Lover” by Kevin Egan (in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, July/August 2018, ed. Linda Landrigan, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

Kevin Tipple’s review covers the whole territory of Shots Fired: Stories From Joe Pickett Country by C. J. Box (2014).

Recent AHMM and EQMM stories are pulling in more and more positive reviews. And more. And more. And for even more, see my blog archives for Short walk #7 (posted July 1), Short walk #2 (May 26), and Short walk #1 (May 19).

New releases, old releases:

Baghdad Noir, Samuel Shimon (August 2018), Marrakech Noir, ed. Yassin Adnan (August 2018), and Santa Cruz Noir (California surf town!), ed. Susie Bright (June 2018).

The Dame Was Trouble, eds. Johnson, Lilburne, MacDonald (August 2018).

Down & Out: The Magazine Issue 4, ed. Rick Ollerman (August 2018).

Writing desk:

A professional proofreader divulges nine tips for uncovering errors in your manuscript.

Free stories:

Mystery Tribune received permission to reprint stories, free to read, from the anthology Mostly Murder Till Death (ed. Lawrence Block, 2016), including: “Nice Guys Finish Last” by JC Andrijeski and “Pride” by Eric J. Gates.

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous You-Solve-It mystery “The Mysterious Meatball Autopsy” appeared in the November 2017 issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (with the solution to the mystery revealed in the December issue).

Breaking news: Mystery Weekly just accepted my new You-Solve-It “Treasure Cave” for publication later this year!

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

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Short walk #12

 

Looking for action? Try a short walk down a dark street.

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

The body was put together from different parts—the door was one color and the hood was another and the bumpers were from an ’82. From “Hannah Martinez” by Sara Gran (in The Highway Kind: Tales of Fast Cars, Desperate Drivers, and Dark Roads, ed. Patrick Millikin, Mulholland Books, 2016).

Point of view:

Reviewing the evidence on Cuddy Plus One by Jeremiah Healy (collected in 2003).

96 crime readers give the star treatment to Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned by Walter Mosley (1998).

New releases, old releases:

The oldest name in mystery magazines released another fresh issue: The Strand Magazine #55 includes a previously unpublished Ernest Hemingway story.

The latest monthly issue of Mystery Weekly (August 2018) arrived like clockwork. As always, on the Mystery Weekly website you can read extended story samples free by clicking the links in the List of Published Titles and also sign up for free stories via email.

Writing desk:

Writers Write describes nine types of unreliable narrators. Or are there ten? Or eleven?

Free zine:

“Lost and Found” by Kristie Claxton, “Judith” by April Snellings, and “Cranked” by Mark Westmoreland are among the free reads at trailblazing crime zine Shotgun Honey.

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-horror flash piece “The Lonely Gravedigger” appeared at Spelk Fiction.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

Short walk #11

 

On the prowl? Take a short walk down a dark street.

More links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Success and fame had always been a crapshoot, but a man’s life ought to boil down to more than the contents of a suitcase in Tijuana. From “The List” by Loren D. Estleman (in The Interrogator and Other Criminally Good Fiction, eds. Ed Gorman and Martin Greenburg, Cemetery Dance Publications, 2012. Originally published in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, May 2010).

Point of view:

Vicki Weisfeld puts the pedal to the metal with her review of Resume Speed and Other Stories by Lawrence Block (collected in 2018).

Kevin Tipple doubles down on Down & Out: The Magazine with ace reviews of Issue 1 and Issue 2.

New releases, old releases:

Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine (new issue, #25)

Coast to Coast: Private Eyes from Sea to Shining Sea, eds. Andrew McAleer and Paul D. Marks (2017).

Writing desk:

Ever wonder what’s going on in an editor’s head? Seven of ‘em tell all: AHMM, BCMM, Dell, EQMM, KRL, Mystery Weekly, OMDB!

Free zine:

“Violet Eyes” by Debra H. Goldstein at Over My Dead Body (2015)

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous robbery whodunit “Listen Up” appeared at Flash Bang Mysteries.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #10

 

Have no fear. It’s just a short walk down a dark street.

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Last year I’d been wandering the Marchesa Ruggieri’s Lombard estate, not hurting anybody, rummaging among her valuables. From “Book of Hours” by Robert Mangeot (in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, July/August 2018, ed. Linda Landrigan, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

Catherine Dilts serves a tasty review of Noir at the Salad Bar.

671 mystery readers give the star treatment to Wait for Signs: Twelve Longmire Stories by Craig Johnson (collected in 2015).

New releases, old releases:

No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack Reacher Short Stories by Lee Child (collected in 2018, includes the Thriller Awards short story finalist “Too Much Time”).

Writing desk:

In a 40-minute video, Lee Child discusses why to break the rules when writing crime fiction. Child covers unlikable characters, “show don’t tell,” and what Elmore Leonard really meant by “never open with the weather.” And he tells a pickle slicer joke and riffs about building suspense and baking a cake.

Free zine:

Two from Akashic Books’ zine Mondays Are Murder: “A Good Day for Redheads” by Patricia Abbott and “When Luck Runs Out” by Zane Castillo.

Check my shorts, please:

My mystery story “Darkness, Darkness” appeared in the July 2017 issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine. (Read a free except at the Mystery Weekly website.)

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

Short walk #9

 

Danger awaits. On a short walk down a dark street.

Another week, another round of links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

I was just getting into Dostoyevsky’s The Gambler, which my brother sent me as part of our monthly book exchange, when two furry monkey paws snatched it and threw it on the deck. From “Curse of the White Armadillo” by William Dylan Powell (in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, July/August 2018, ed. Janet Hutchings, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

71 mystery readers give the star treatment to A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women, ed. Elizabeth George (collected in 2005).

New releases, old releases:

Lock your doors and unlock your gun cabinets. Switchblade Issue 6 was released into the civilian population.

Miami Noir, ed. Les Standiford (Akashic Books, 2007).

Writing desk:

A complete summary of guidelines and story preferences for twenty-five mystery and crime markets. One catch: the summary was published in 1937. (Reprinted online at Black Mask Magazine.)

Free zine:

Two freebies by Michael Bracken at ezine Tough, “Texas Hot Flash” and “Itsy Bitsy Spider.”

Check my shorts, please:

My supernatural voodoo mystery “Most Evil” appeared in the anthology Busted! Arresting Stories from the Beat.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #8

 

Crave more thrills? Try a short walk down a dark street.

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Looking back on it, with everything that’s happened, Sammy disappearing and all, I’m not sure I did the right thing. From “Preacher’s” Kid by Jessica Powers (in Lone Star Noir, eds. Bobby Byrd and Johnny Byrd, Akashic Books, 2010).

Point of view:

A review from a guy who just likes to read: Hap and Leonard (short stories) by Joe R. Lansdale (2016).

New releases, old releases:

A New Omnibus of Crime, eds. Tony Hillerman and Rosemary Herbert, contributing eds. Sue Grafton and Jeffrey Deaver (2005).

Writing desk:

Lessons on success for authors, from Brendan Dubois.

Free zine:

Pop open the July 2018 issue of Flash Bang Mysteries for six free stories.

Check my shorts, please:

My crime story “Eternal Love” appeared in Switchblade Issue 4.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #7

 

For a good time take a short walk down a dark street.

More links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

It must have been Friday because the fish smell from the Mansion House coffee-shop next door was strong enough to build a garage on. From “Bay City Blues” by Raymond Chandler (in Raymond Chandler: Collected Stories, Everyman’s Library, collected in 2002).

Point of view:

Hardboiled hilarity from Bill Pronzini.

The hepcats at Kingdom Books jump to the jive with a review of Detroit Is Our Beat by Loren D. Estleman (collected in 2015).

Reviews of the new AHMM and EQMM issues are rolling in. And in. And in. And in.

New releases, old releases:

The latest monthly issue of Mystery Weekly, July 2018, arrived like clockwork (includes my story “Locked Tight”).

Writing desk:

The inside scoop on moderating a Bouchercon short story panel.

Free reads:

Sign up on the Mystery Weekly website to receive free stories from future issues. You can also read extended samples of already-published stories by clicking the story titles.

Check my shorts, please:

(See above.) The new issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine includes my whodunit-howdunit “Locked Tight.”

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis