Short walk #110

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

With the third murder, three weeks later, I go into alarm mode. From “On Pacific Beach” by Patti Abbott (In I Bring Sorrow: And Other Stories of Transgression. By Patricia Abbott. Collected in 2018. Polis Books.)

Point of view:

Robert Lopresti reviews the best mystery story he reads each week. Like this one. And this one and this one. And this one too.

New releases, old releases:

The latest issue of The Strand Magazine (June 2020) includes a previously unpublished Louisa May Alcott story.

Switchblade (Issue Twelve, June 2020) features hard luck tales of the human condition, before and after Covid-19.

Thriller Magazine (Volume 3 Issue 1, June 2020) showcases a wide range of tales, from psychological thrillers, to brutal tales of murder, to political thrillers (includes one of my stories, see below).

Tricks of the Trade:

To create stakes for a character in your story, look beyond the plot and brainstorm different ways the stakes might affect the character.

Free Reads:

“Ghost Town” by Lydia Lunch (from Akashic Book’s The Heroin Chronicles).

Check my shorts, please:

The new issue of Thriller Magazine includes my crime-suspense story “They Die in Eight Minutes” (originally published in Shotgun Honey in 2014).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

 

Short walk #109

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

I figured they’d keep me alive as long as they could, since it would make my body less smelly and therefore more convenient to carry and dump somewhere. From “Rest Stop” by Jeremiah Healy (In Cuddy Plus One. Collected in 2003. By Jeremiah Healy. Crippen & Landru.) For a review see the Point of View section in Short walk #12.

Point of view:

Review: Lockdown: Stories of Crime, Terror, and Hope During a Pandemic is an anthology of crime, suspense, and horror stories highlighting the challenges of lockdown during a major world pandemic.

New releases, old releases:

Heartbreaks & Half-truths: 22 Stories of Mystery & Suspense is a new anthology about lovers and losers (June 2020). For a review see the Point of View section in Short walk #107.

Bibliomysteries (2018) is an anthology of mystery and crime stories set in the world of books. For a review see the Point of View section in Short walk #60.

Tricks of the Trade:

Submission call—a new Mardi Gras Mysteries anthology is open for submissions July 1 through August 31. Check out the details.

Free Reads:

All the latest free-to-read flash fiction from Mystery Tribune.

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous private eye story “With Cunning Wickedness” was reprinted, free to read, at Trigger Warning: Short Fiction With Pictures (originally appeared in the anthology The Shamus Sampler II).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #108

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

She glanced at her arm and the tattoo of an angel wielding a sword. From “Mary Poppins Didn’t Have Tattoos” by Stacy Woodson (in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, July/August 2020, ed. Janet Hutchings, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

Reviews: Eight Dashiell Hammett Continental Op stories that will make your heart pound. For three of Hammett’s Continental Op stories, free-to-read, see the Free Reads section of Short walk #73.

New releases, old releases:

New issues of AHMM and EQMM (July/August 2020).

Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled (2018) is an anthology of 13 dire and gritty noir tales by women crime writers. For a review see the Point of View section in Short walk #69.

Tricks of the Trade:

A 17-step approach to editing your short story for structure, punctuation, and grammar.

Free Reads:

“Of Mice and Manny” by Todd Robinson (at Beat to a Pulp).

Check my shorts, please:

My crime story “Eternal Love” appeared in Switchblade: Issue 4.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #107

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Once Boshell finally killed his neighbor he couldn’t seem to quit killing him. He killed him again whenever he felt unloved or blue or simply had empty hours facing him. From “The Echo of Neighborly Bones” by Daniel Woodrell (In The Outlaw Album: Stories. By Daniel Woodrell. Little, Brown and Company. Collected in 2011).

Point of view:

Review: Silver Bullets is a reprint anthology of commemorating publisher Crippen & Landru’s 25th anniversary in publishing.

Review: Trouble & Strife is a themed anthology using Cockney rhyming slang as inspiration for 11 crime stories.

Review: Heartbreaks and Half-truths is an anthology of 22 stories of mystery and suspense.

Review: Crime Travel is an anthology of stories that blend crime and time travel. For two more reviews of this anthology see the Point of View section in Short walk #83.

New releases, old releases:

Black Cat Mystery Magazine (#6) is a new BCMM issue and includes seven original stories and a classic reprint.

The Darkling Halls of Ivy is a new anthology set in and around colleges and universities (2020, edited by Lawrence Block).

Life Is Short and Then You Die: Mystery Writers of America Presents First Encounters with Murder (2019) is a YA anthology focused on teen encounters with murder.

Tricks of the Trade:

A retired homicide detective offers insights about using non-verbal communication when interviewing uncooperative people..

Free Reads:

“Gateway to the Stars” by Matthew McGevna (from Long Island Noir).

“Live for Today” by S.A. Solomon (from New Jersey Noir).

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-horror story “Disaster Adjuster” was reprinted in The Literary Hatchet Issue 21. (The story originally appeared in Kzine in 2017.)

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

 

Short walk #106

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

O’Conner crossed his arms before his face as the blast from the shotgun knocked him down. From “The Heist” by Gary Phillips and Richard Brewer (in Culprits: The Heist Was Just the Beginning, eds. Brewer and Phillips. Polis Books 2018).

Point of view:

Links to five reviews by Short Mystery Fiction Society President Kevin Tipple:

“The Imposter” is a Mike Bowditch short story by Paul Doiron and a fast, fun read.

Sordid is a five-story crime collection by Harry Hunsicker that is graphic, violent, and a very good read.

The Spring 2020 issue of Flash Bang Mysteries (online, free to read, see link at review site) includes four quick, good reads.

The February 2020 issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine is a quality issue withinteresting characters, complex mysteries, and lots going on.

“The Case of the Nameless Diablo” is an entertaining cozy-style private eye story.

New releases, old releases:

The latest issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (June 2020), includes my You-Solve-It mystery “Gallery Thief” – solution will appear in July issue).

And on the Mystery Weekly website you can read free samples of new and old stories by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories. You can also sign up to have free stories emailed to you.

Tricks of the Trade:

Two essays for mystery writers on hiding clues, here and here. And for two more see Short walks #32and #71.

Free Reads:

The short story archives of the Crime Readers’ Association includes about a gazillion free reads, all written by members of the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association (which sponsors the CWA Dagger Awards).

Check my shorts, please:

My You-Solve-It mystery “Gallery Thief” appears in the latest issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (June 2020, solution will appear in the July issue).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #105

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Safe from eavesdroppers in the clatter of a Sutter Street lunchroom, the detective-sergeant leaned over his clam chowder and told me what he knew about the murder, which wasn’t much. From “Death on Pine Street” by Dashiell Hammett (In Nightmare Town: Stories by Dashiell Hammett, eds. McCauley, Greenberg, Gorman. Vintage Crime/Black Lizard, collected in 2000).

Point of view:

Review: Of Mice and Minestrone is a Joe R. Lansdale Hap and Leonard collection about the duo’s early years.

Reviews: The Mysterious Mr. Quinn and Poirot Investigates are collections of classic Agatha Christie mystery stories—reviews here and here.

New releases, old releases:

Deadly Anniversaries (2020) is a mystery anthology commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Mystery Writers of America.

For a review, see the Point of View section of Short walk #104.

Tricks of the Trade:

A Science-Fiction editor and author (who also writes occasional crime stories) offers a three-stage approach to revising stories before submitting them.

Free Reads:

Three Father Brown mysteries by G.K. Chesterton.

“The Invisible Man”“The Secret Garden”“The Sign of the Broken Sword”

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous You-Solve-It Mystery “The Mysterious Meatball Autopsy” appeared in the November 2017 issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (with the solution to the mystery revealed in the December issue).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #104

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

When the burglar turned his eyes on Archer Trebizond his heart fluttered and fluttered again, first at the mere fact of discovery, then at his own discovery of the gleaming revolver in Trebizond’s hand. From “A Bad Night for Burglars” by Lawrence Block (in The Burglar in Short Order [Bernie Rhodenbarr collection], independently published. Collected in 2020. Story originally appeared in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine in 1977.)

Point of view:

Review: Deadly Anniversaries is a mystery anthology commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Mystery Writers of America.

Review: Die Once–Die Twice is a collection of previously unpublished stories by paperback-era noir author Gil Brewer.

Review: The Beat of Black Wings is an anthology of crime fiction inspired by the songs of Joni Mitchell.

New releases, old releases:

Berkeley Noir (May 2020) is the latest release in the long-running anthology series from Akashic Books.

For reviews of previous anthologies in this series, see the Point of View sections in Short Walk#55, #67, and #90.

For free stories from the series, see the Free Reads sections of Short Walk #71, #92, #97, and #100.

Tricks of the Trade:

One of the editors at All Due Respect riffs about writing short crime stories, with notes on characters, plot, action, and focus. (ADR is open for submissions too. Check out the details here.)

Free Reads:

“On the Edge” by Sharon Diane King at All Due Respect.

“Against the Grain” by Rob McClure Smith at Tough.

Check my shorts, please:

My story “Ten-Spot Robber” appeared in the anthology Hardboiled.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #103

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

That evening, shortly after eight, the invisible killer claimed his fourth victim. From “The Problem of the Boston Common” by Edward D. Hoch (in More Things Impossible, The Second Casebook of Dr. Sam Hawthorne, Crippen & Landru, collected in 2006.)

Point of view:

Reviews: Over four dozen Edward D. Hoch impossible crime stories in four different collections (including the collection featured above)—See the Point of View section in Short walk #30.

Reviews: Kevin Tipple covers the anthology Hoosier Noir and the January issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine, here and here.

New releases, old releases:

The latest issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (May 2020).

And on the Mystery Weekly website you can read free samples of new and old stories by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories. You can also sign up to have free stories emailed to you.

Tricks of the Trade:

A third generation cop offers real-world tips on avoiding glaring procedural mistakes in crime fiction.

Free Reads:

All the latest free-to-read flash fiction from Mystery Tribune.

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous robbery whodunit “Listen Up” appeared at Flash Bang Mysteries.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

Short walk #102

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

According to the statistics, a town the size of Totterbridge can expect to have only one really interesting murder every fifteen years. From “A Gross Miscarriage of Justice” by Joyce Porter (in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, May/June 2020, ed. Linda Landrigan, Dell Magazines. Published in AHMM Mystery Classic section, story copyright 1978.)

Point of view:

Review: Broken is a new collection of six Don Winslow novellas.

New releases, old releases:

Fighters of Fear: Occult Detective Stories (2020) is an anthology that mixes detective tales with weird or supernatural fiction.

The First Prehistoric Serial Killer and Other Stories (2018) is a zany story collection by Teresa Solana. For two reviews, see the Point of View section in Short walk #47.

Tricks of the Trade:

Hank Phillippi Ryan on making every word count.

Free Reads:

Four free to read stories in the new issue of Flash Bang Mysteries.

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous private eye yarn “The Belle Hope” appeared in the anthology Malice Domestic 13: Mystery Most Geographical.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #101

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

The last person I expected to call me to a murder scene was Bowie Crapster. From “Noble Rot” by Richard Helms (in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, May/June 2020, ed. Janet Hutchings, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

Review: The Eyes of Texas: Private Eyes From The Panhandle To The Piney Woods is a an entertaining mystery anthology and “there is not a weak tale” it.

Essay: What will happen to public libraries, even after the pandemic?

New releases, old releases:

101 Great Thriller Short Stories (Free on Kindle, collected in April 2020) features tales by Agatha Christie, Frank Packard, Edgar Allan Poe, Philip K. Dick, and many others.

The Night and the Music: Matt Scudder Stories, by Lawrence Block (collected in 2011). For a review, see the Point of View section in Short Walk #14.

Tricks of the Trade:

Occult Detective Magazine is open for submissions until June 5. Check out the details.For the editor’s views on submissions, writing, and rejections see Tricks of the Trade in Short walk #62.

Free Reads:

The Dark City Crime & Mystery Magazine posted all five stories from the April 2020 issue, free to read. (On their site, scroll down then click each story headline.)

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-suspense story “Murderous Lies” is a free-to-listen podcast from King’s River Life Magazine. The story was originally published in Suspense Magazine in 2013.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis