Short walk #86

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

We found the first bone about midmorning one day in late June—the sun already high, the heat rising too. From “The Boy Detective and the Summer of ‘74” by Art Taylor (in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, January/February 2020, ed. Linda Landrigan, Dell Magazines.)

Point of view:

An essay in appreciation of locked room mysteries.

Review: Invisible Blood.

New releases, old releases:

Occult Detective Magazine #6 (December 2019. Formerly Occult Detective Quarterly.)

The latest monthly issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (January 2020).

And on the Mystery Weekly website you can read free samples of new and old stories by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories. You can also sign up to have free stories emailed to you.

Tricks of the Trade:

A devotee of “rejectomancy” (the arcane practice of divining hidden meaning from rejection letters) reflects on three types of tough rejections and what to do about them.

Free Reads:

“Blackout” by Luke Foster, “Sign of the Rose” by J.A. Prentice, and “Whiskey Noir” by Daphne Strasert, all at Crimson Streets.

Check my shorts, please:

My locked-jail-cell impossible crime story “Locked Tight” appeared in Mystery Weekly Magazine in July 2018. You can read a free excerpt on the Mystery Weekly website, a review from Kevin Tipple here, and one from Catherine Dilts here.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #85

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

By the time the news of Bailey’s accident spread through the rural settlement of Box Hill, there were several versions of how it happened. From “Blood Drive” by John Grisham (in Ford County: Stories, John Grisham. Bantam, collected in 2010.)

Point of view:

Review: Kevin Tipple covers the September issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine, cover to cover.

Review: Mystery Tour (ed. Martin Edwards, 2017.)

New releases, old releases:

Vintage Crime: from the Crime Writers’ Association (ed. Martin Edwards, 2020. Available for pre-order.)

Blood on Their Hands ed., Lawrence Block (December 2018).

Tricks of the Trade:

Editor Michael Bracken on editing anthologies, Black Cat Mystery Magazine, and what he looks for in the slush pile: here and here.

Free Reads:

“The Six-Year-Old Serial Killer” by Chris Chan and “Moby Mick” by BV Lawson at Akashic Books’ Mondays Are Murder.

“Portrait of a Hotel Photographer” by Jack Bates and “The Rule of Three” by Albert Tucher at Shotgun Honey.

“Fred” by Gerald So at Mystery Tribune.

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous crime romp “Rolling Lucky” is free to read at The Norwegian American newspaper website.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #84

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Moon shadows are blacker than hearses and I knew I wasn’t the only one out that night. From “Lucky Dip” by Liza Cody (In Bad Behavior: Mystery Stories, ed. Mary Higgins Clark. Gulliver Books, 1995. Limited availability.)

Point of view:

An appreciation of the mystery shorts of PD James.

Reviews: Golden Age stories: Mysteries on the Waves, Bodies from the Library, and Bodies from the Library 2, here, here, and here.

New releases, old releases:

New issues of EQMM and AHMM (January/February 2020), with story excerpts and magazine features free-to-read online.

Brand X: A Collection of Stories (by Christianna Brand, collected in 2013).

The Spotted Cat and Other Mysteries from Inspector Cockrill’s Casebook (by Christianna Brand, collected in 2002).

Tricks of the Trade:

Editor Tony Medawar on putting together the Golden Age anthology Bodies from the Library.

Free Reads:

From the Gutenberg Project, Masterpieces of Mystery: Detective Stories (includes free stories by Anton Chekhov, Wilkie Collins, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe).

Check my shorts, please:

My humorous private eye yarn “The Belle Hope” appeared in the anthology Malice Domestic 13: Mystery Most Geographical and was a Finalist in the 2019 Derringer Awards.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

 

Short walk #83

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Not like the killers in the books he read, always neat and organized, no, he’d been down in the slime and spit and bloody snot, flailing with the targets, feeling the life wriggle out of some badass mothers. From “The Haze” by James W. Hall (in Bibliomysteries: Volume Two, ed. Otto Penzler. Pegasus Books 2018).

Point of view:

Reviews: Crime Travel (at BOLO Books and Lesa’s Book Critiques) here and here.

ReviewFrom Sea to Stormy Sea: 17 Stories Inspired by Great American Paintings (at Criminal Element).

New releases, old releases:

A Time For Violence: Stories with an Edge (2019). For reviews of this anthology, please see the POV sections of Short walk #76 and #59.

Everybody Pays (by Andrew Vachss, collected in 1999).

Tricks of the Trade:

Classic essays on the short mystery by EQMM editor Janet Hutchings, legendary author Edward D. Hoch, and former Edgar Awards short story chair Steven Saylor here, here, and here.

Free Reads:

The new (Holiday) issue of Yellow Mama is live.

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-suspense story “They Die in Eight Minutes” first appeared, free to read, at Shotgun Honey in 2014.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #82

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Nick Wool woke up and wished he hadn’t. From “Boneshaker” by Maggie Estep (in Hardboiled Brooklyn, ed. Reed Farrel Coleman, Bleak House Books, 2006).

Point of view:

Robert Lopresti reviews the best mystery story he reads each week. Like this one. And this one and this one. And this one and this one too.

New releases, old releases:

Crime Travel (November 2019).

From Sea to Stormy Sea: 17 Stories Inspired by Great American Paintings (December 2019).

Merchants of Menace (2018).

Tricks of the Trade:

How stuff works: Standard police interrogation technique, step-by-step.

Free Reads:

The entire past library of stories from crime ‘zine All Due Respect—58 of ‘em, free to read. (And ADR has now reopened for ‘zine submissions and suggests reading past stories for examples of what they want.)

Check my shorts, please:

My crime story “Eternal Love” appeared in Switchblade: Issue 4.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #81

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Detective Lieutenant Dan Barker, L.A.P.D., felt no compulsion to stare at the body on the bed of the seedy Skid Row lodging house. From “Screwball Division” by Anthony Boucher (in Exeunt Murderers: The Best Mystery Stories of Anthony Boucher, eds. Nevins and Greenberg. Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition collected in 1983. Ebook from MysteriousPress.com/Open Road, 2019).

Point of view:

Reviews: Kevin Tipple covers the August issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine, cover to cover and reviews a standalone Joe Gunther short by Archer Mayer.

New releases, old releases:

Mystery Tribune #11, print edition, is hot off the presses.

Mystery Weekly Magazine (December 2019) arrived like clockwork.

And on the Mystery Weekly website you can read free samples of new and old stories by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories. You can also sign up to have free stories emailed to you.

Tricks of the Trade:

The inside story on the current status of Occult Detective Quarterly (now Occult Detective Magazine).

Free Reads:

Twenty free stories and novella excerpts, courtesy of The Strand Magazine.

Check my shorts, please:

The solution to my impossible crime You-Solve-It “Disappearing Diamonds” appears in the latest issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (story in November issue).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #80

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Robbing banks is a tough habit to break. From “You Owe Me” by Loren D. Estleman (in Desperate Detroit and Stories of Other Dire Places, Loren D. Estleman. Gallery Books, collected in 2016.)

Point of view:

Review: The Department of Dead Ends (a collection of “inverted mysteries” by Roy Vickers. Collected in 1979, limited availability.)

New releases, old releases:

Down and Out the Magazine Volume 2, Issue 1 (November 2019).

The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century (2001).

Tricks of the Trade:

A short walk encore presentation—two Michael Bracken essays on selling stories, here and here.

Free Read:

“Lamb to the Slaughter” by Roald Dahl. (The classic crime story that became an Alfred Hitchcock Presents TV episode.)

Check my shorts, please:

My impossible crime You-Solve-It “Disappearing Diamonds” appears in the latest issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (Solution in December issue).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis