Short walk #54

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

A door opened down the street and, for just a moment before it closed, I heard a piano playing the saddest tune in the world. From “The Long Sonata of the Dead” by Andrew Taylor (in Bibliomysteries: Stories of Crime in the World of Books and Bookstores, ed. Otto Penzler, Pegasus Books, 2017).

Point of view:

Robert Lopresti reviews the best mystery story he reads each week. Here’s one from EQMM, one from Fiction River: Spies, one from AHMM, another from Fiction River: Spies, and one from Houston Noir.

New releases, old releases:

The title story was a BAMS 2018 selection: Death in the Serengeti and Other Stories: Ten Tales of Crime by David H. Hendrickson (collected in 2019).

Edited by Elizabeth GeorgeA Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women (2005).

Tricks of the Trade:

A real-world police detective reveals ten traps that could kill your fictional detective.

Free reads:

“The Key” by Earl Staggs at King’s River Life.

“An Occurrence on Oliver Street” and “About that Night” by Heidi Heimler, and “Trauma” by Robert Petyo, all at Yellow Mama.

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-horror story “Dead Ringer” appeared in Issue 22 of Kzine.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

PS – A short walk down a dark street just passed its one-year anniversary. (Short walk #1 posted on May 22, 2018.) So if you’re looking for trouble, try the Archives and Search Box on the right-hand side of the screen.

 

Short walk #53

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Harry was hooked on crime the way some people are addicted to cocaine, alcohol, chocolate, and unrequited love. From “A Little Missionary Work” by Sue Grafton (in Kinsey and Me: Stories, Marian Wood Books/Putnam).

Point of view:

Reviews of two Ruth Rendell collections, here and here.

New releases, old releases:

Hot off the presses: Mystery Tribune Spring 2019.

Clown Noir. Who knew? Greasepaint and 45s (ed. Ryan Sayles).

Tricks of the Trade:

The editors of pulp zines Broadswords and Blasters and Econoclash swap tweets about forcing characters to make choices.

Free reads:

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, a 12-story collection by Arthur Conan Doyle, free to read at the Gutenberg Project.

Check my shorts, please:

The upcoming anthology The Best Laid Plans (Superior Shores Press, June 2019) will include my impossible-crime private eye tale “Callingdon Mountain.”

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

PS – Last week, Short walk #52 marked 52 weeks of weekly posts for the blog, though even #53 isn’t quite the one-year anniversary because Short walk #1 posted on May 22, 2018. (Huh?) For a good time, try the Archives and Search Box on the right-hand side of the screen.

 

Short walk #52

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

“He’s a swell man,” she said dispassionately, “when he’s sober; and when he’s drinking he’s all right except with women and money.” From “Too Many Have Lived” by Dashiell Hammett (In Nightmare Town: Stories by Dashiell Hammett, eds. McCauley, Greenberg and Gorman, Vintage Crime/Black Lizard, collected in 2000).

Point of view:

Kevin Burton Smith is on the scene reviewing The Big Book Female Detectives.

New releases, old releases:

Noir tour: Houston Noir, Milwaukee Noir, Berlin Noir, Sydney Noir, Amsterdam Noir, Hong Kong Noir.

Tricks of the Trade:

For those who missed Short walk #3 (way back in June): EQMM editor Janet Hutchings discusses why the end of a story should come first.

Free reads:

“In the Morning Hour She Calls Me” by Russell W. Johnson at Tough.

“A Question of Execution” by Basil Rosa at Retreats from Oblivion: The Journal of NoirCon.

Check my shorts, please:

My flash piece “The Interrogation” appeared in the March 2016 issue of Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine as the story that won the AHMM Monthly Mysterious Photograph Contest.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

PS – Short walk #52 marks 52 weeks of weekly posts for the blog, though isn’t quite the one-year anniversary because Short walk #1 posted on May 22, 2018. (Huh?) For a good time, try the Archives and Search Box on the right-hand side of the screen.

 

Short walk #51

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

I had long ago learned to keep my mouth shut even when I wanted to roar. From “Breadfruit” by Brian Silverman (in The Best American Mystery Stories, 2018, eds. Penny and Penzler. Mariner Books Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018. Story originally appeared in Mystery Tribune). **See footnote.

Point of view:

Review: Pyles of Books reveals how Switchblade Issue 9 stacks up.

Reviews: BOLO Books looks into a Peter Lovesey collection and the anthology Sunshine Noir.

Review: Ben Boulden taps a classic John D. MacDonald story from the hardboiled crime anthology American Pulp.

New releases, old releases:

May’s monthly issue of Mystery Weekly arrived like clockwork. On the Mystery Weekly website you can read free story samples, new and old, by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories, and also sign up for free stories via email.

Tricks of the Trade:

The Short Mystery Fiction Society announced the winners of the 22nd annual Derringer Awards (since 1998) for outstanding mystery stories.

Free reads:

The Short Mystery Fiction Society’s blog recently linked a fearsome line-up of free stories: one by 2019 Derringer Award Finalist Diana Deverell, two from 2019 Edgar Award Winner Art Taylor, one from current SMFS President Kevin R. Tipple, and the two 2019 Agatha Award winning stories, from Leslie Budewitz and Tara Laskowski.

Check my shorts, please:

My story “Darkness, Darkness” appeared in the July 2017 issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

** Beginning with Short walk #32 the blog has now short-sampled every story from the exceptional anthology The Best American Mystery Stories 2018, proceeding alphabetically by author through the Table of Contents until all twenty stories in the volume were included. Links were provided to both the BAMS 2018 anthology and story’s original publisher.