Short walk #67

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

The end of London looked very like the end of the world: and the last lamppost of the suburbs like a lonely star in space. From “The Garden of Smoke” by G.K. Chesterton (in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, September/October 2019, ed. Linda Landrigan, Dell Magazines. Mystery Classic story: originally published in 1919).

Point of view:

ReviewKingston Noir.

ReviewTough 2: Crime Stories.

New releases, old releases:

Death Among Us: An Anthology of Murder Mystery Short Stories (2019).

Dashiell Hammett: Crime Stories and Other Writings (collected in 2001).

Tricks of the Trade:

“How to Write Killer Flash Fiction.”

Free Reads:

“One Spent Shell” by Dan J. Fiore at Tough.

“Mysterious Ways and All That” by Gary Priest at Crimson Streets.

Check my shorts, please:

The anthology The Best Laid Plans includes my impossible-crime private eye tale “Callingdon Mountain” (Kindle format on sale 99c until 8/27. U.S. and U.K. only).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #66

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Truth was, Gravedigger Peace didn’t remember his dreams these days. Not ever. Not one. From “A Sleep Not Unlike Death” by Sean Chercover (in Between the Dark and the Daylight and 27 More of the Best Crime & Mystery Stories of the Year, eds. Gorman and Greenberg. Tyrus Books, 2009).

Point of view:

Reviews: Two from Vicki Weisfeld (at crime fiction lover) — Exit Wounds and Milwaukee Noir.

New releases, old releases:

New issues of EQMM and AHMM (Sept/Oct 2019).

Tough 2: Crime Stories (2019).

Barking at Butterflies and Other Stories (by Evan Hunter aka Ed McBain, collected in 2000).

Tricks of the Trade:

Author and Editor Richard Thomas considers different ways neo-noir films can inspire storytelling.

Free Reads:

“Swimmer” by Mark Cotton, “The Last Time I Almost Used” by Jennifer Carr, and “Howie’s Cell” by Chris McCartney, all in the new issue of Yellow Mama.

Check my shorts, please:

My crime-horror story “Dead Ringer” appeared in Issue 22 of Kzine.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

PS – Breaking news: Yellow Mama accepted my creepy crime-horror story “Stegmann’s Basement” for publication in October. The story originally appeared at Spelk Fiction.

 

Short walk #65

Weekly links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

Burning flares and flashing red and blue lights ripped the night apart. From “Mulholland Drive” by Michael Connelly (in Los Angeles Noir, ed. Denise Hamilton. Akashic Books, 2007. Reprinted in The Best American Mystery Stories 2008, eds. Penzler and Pelecanos. Quercus Publishing Plc).

Point of view:

Reviews: Down In The Devil Hole and The Stoner Stories, here and here.

New releases, old releases:

Exit Wounds (2019).

The Best American Noir of the Century (2011).

Tricks of the Trade:

Short story writing tips from Kurt Vonnegut.

Free Reads:

“Everyone Talks” by Lee Child, free to read at Penguin Books, Australia.

Check my shorts, please:

My flash piece “The Interrogation” appeared in the March 2016 issue of Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine as the story that won the AHMM Monthly Mysterious Photograph Contest.

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis

 

Short walk #64

This week’s links to what’s fresh, what’s famous, and what’s fiendish in short mystery and crime fiction.

Short sample:

The police came on a Tuesday afternoon, in the dead middle of the New Mexico summer. From “The Long-Term Tenant” by Tara Laskowski (in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Black Mask Story, July/August 2019, ed. Janet Hutchings, Dell Magazines).

Point of view:

Reviews: bookgasm and Paperback Warrior dig into The Best of Manhunt, a new anthology of stories from the pulp magazine of the ‘50s and ‘60s, here and here.

New releases, old releases:

From the Writers’ Police Academy: After Midnight: Tales from the Graveyard Shift (July 2019).

The August monthly issue of Mystery Weekly arrived like clockwork in paperback and Kindle formats. And on the Mystery Weekly website you can read free story samples, new and old, by clicking the links to Recent Published Stories, and also sign up to receive free stories via email.

Tricks of the Trade:

The acquisitions editor at Pulp Literature riffs about reading submissions, identifying story structure problems, and developing strong characters.

Free Reads:

The latest freebies from Mystery Tribune.

Check my shorts, please:

My story “Ten-Spot Robber” appears in the anthology Hardboiled (paperback and Kindle, included in free-to-read Kindle Unlimited program).

Thanks for visiting.

Peter DiChellis